Research

Research

SSPC has been responsible for much high quality research and for bringing new research funding into Scottish universities. By facilitating collaborative and capacity-building activities, together with the ground-breaking work by Universities affiliated with SSPC, the School has contributed to Scotland’s current position as a world-leader in primary care research.

Research includes the Scotland-wide RCT led by Frank Sullivan on the treatment of Bell's Palsy, published in the New England Journal of Medicine and receiving Paper of the Year Award from the BMA in 2009.

SSPC has also supported career capacity building for cancer research in both Aberdeen and Edinburgh Universities. At Glasgow University, career capacity building for multimorbidity was aided by funding the establishment of a new Chair in Primary Care Research in 2008.

The multimorbidity programme was further developed through an Applied Research Programme; ‘Living Well with Multimorbidity’ led by Professor Stewart Mercer and funded through a successful competitive bid to the Chief-Scientist Office (CSO). The work was published in the Lancet in 2012 and won Best Paper of the Year Award from the RCGP in 2013.

Other SSPC-affiliated research programmes  established as result of successful applications for CSO programme funding in 2008 include:

  • Data-driven quality improvement in primary care led by Prof Bruce Guthrie (University of Dundee)
  • Telemetric supported self-monitoring of long-term conditions led by Prof Brian McKinstry (University of Edinburgh)
  • Pharmacovigilance for children: Signal generation from linked NHS administrative data co-investigator Prof Christine Bond (University of Aberdeen)

These CSO funded programmes of research have resulted in major outputs; to date eleven papers in the top-10 general medical journals in the world including  the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet and the BMJ, as well as 47 other peer-reviewed papers and editorials and significant impact on practice in relation to multimorbidity, telehealth and prescribing safety.